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How can you break the habit of chasing dogs?

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Some dogs like to chase after fast-moving objects, including cars. They saw the car in the distance, and they hurried off. Some dogs are so motivated to chase cars that they fall asleep on the sidewalk or in the ditch and, when the car approaches, jump to get rid of them. Obviously, this is a very dangerous hobby. Car chasers are often seriously injured or killed — usually not by the car they are chasing, but by a passer-by when a dog jumps on the road. They can also cause serious car accidents when drivers turn around to avoid them and are startled by their sudden appearance on the road. Even stray dogs attracted by traffic can cause problems. A leaky dog ​​can be very happy when passing cars — barking, barking, and breathing as cars pass by. He would be so happy that he could injure himself and his pet parent by jumping on the road and dragging his owner with him.

Because chasing is a dangerous behavior that dogs are often strongly encouraged to do, treatment should be directed by a specialist. If you have a dog that is already having trouble chasing cars, contact a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB), a board-certified veterinarian, or a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT). (Please refer to our article, Getting Professional Help, to help you find an expert in your area.)

 

It’s best if you can prevent your dog from learning that chasing cars is fun. Although chasing is a natural tendency for most dogs, if you can distract your dog and teach him that doing something like turning on you is more fun than chasing cars, you can stop chasing the shoot before it becomes a problem.

Chasing cars

Prevention

You must catch the first-minute showing interest in the movement of the car and direct its attention to another type of fun! When you go with him and see that he shows any interest in car travel, you want to teach him to associate traffic and good things from you. Before you embark on your next trip, prepare by bringing a nice treat or a favorite toy. As you walk, as soon as you see your dog looking at the car, say its name. When he turns to you, praise him and give him sulfur or two or beat him with a toy or wave him. If he doesn’t turn to you when you say his name, swing something or his toy in front of his nose and lick his head towards you. When he turns to the tray or to the toy, give it to him. Keep doing this every time a car passes by until your dog automatically looks at you expecting to handle or play whenever he sees a car moving.

 

Not all dogs that chase cars inside a fenced yard will chase cars once they are free. But some will be as the joy of chasing becomes too strong to be ignored. Besides, some dogs are so eager to use the fence that they can injure themselves or jump over the fence. Chasing cars inside the fence can also grow into chasing other objects, such as runners or skateboards, as they pass through the yard. If there is almost no chance for your dog to get out of the yard and your dog does not show any interest in chasing other moving objects, chasing a car inside a fenced area is “safe” and good exercise for the underestimated or underexercised) dog. But if your dog barks too hard or the fence may cause some problems, or if you think it might be able to escape the yard, you need to interrupt it and let it in whenever it starts to chase. As you walk, a good time to interrupt is when your dog sees a car. This means that to stop chasing, you will have to look at your dog every second when it is out. Another option is to put a stock fence on the stock (a solid wood fence) or attach tarps to an existing fence so that your dog can see the traffic and not be encouraged to chase. If you choose to leave your dog in the yard, please keep these two points in mind:

Never leave your dog in the yard unattended for more than 15 to 20 minutes.

Provide plenty of exercise and exercise so that your dog is less motivated to chase cars. (Please refer to our articles, Adding Your Dog’s Health and Dog Training, to learn more about keeping your dog busy, healthy and happy.)

How to Treat a Dog Already Chasing Cars

Keep your dog in a safe kraal or enclosed yard so that he cannot chase cars on the road.

If you are walking your dog, do so only in areas where he cannot see or reach the streets.

Teach your dog to remember reliable so you can drive your dog whenever you need it. Please see our article, Teaching Your Dog to Come When You Are Called, for help. To be successful, you will need to start training your dog away from traffic areas so that your dog can focus on learning the benefits of coming to you. That’s when your dog is extremely trustworthy when it comes to being called when you have to “check” him out between cars. However, be sure to take him or her only through long lines (a training leash 15 meters or more) in case he or she does not respond.

 

What not to do

Do not expose your dog to traffic and physically pat it. That is inhumane and impossible to stop your dog. Ideally, it may not chase cars when you are around, but it will not learn not to do it when you are not there. Worse yet, you could injure your dog, undermine your self-confidence, and cause other behavioral problems, such as fear and anger.

Do not intentionally let your dog leave the back of the car and let it hit the end of a long line as it runs dead. That can cause serious damage to your dog’s neck and spine.

Do not try to intimidate your dog by deliberately chasing cars by “hitting” him with a car or by throwing something out of the car window at him. You could end up seriously injuring or killing your dog.

Wendy Hendriks

Wendy Hendriks

This is Wendy Hendriks From iClean Internationals Ltd. Life-long learner, committed to working hard at self directed learning environment.

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iClean Carwash Technologies has 50 years of experience in car wash technology and dealing with water and waste water in particular. iClean Carwash Technologies is the marketleader in full biological water reclaim systems. We have been offering our famous stainless steel products for export for several decades. Thirteen years ago, we expanded our product range with the iClean Dog Wash, which became the global Dog Wash standard.